The Disability Expert

A Free Guide to Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income Disability Benefits


 

 
 

Your Ability to Do Physical Work-Related Functions and Your Social Security Disability Claim

By R. M. Bottger

When you apply for disability benefits, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will evaluate how your medical condition limits your ability to perform functions that are needed in order to work. (See How Your Condition Affects Your Ability to Function: The Key to Disability Benefits.)  When SSA evaluates your disability claim, it will look at how your condition affects your ability to do the following physical work-related functions:

  • How much you can lift and carry on a frequent basis
  • How much you can lift and carry on an occasional basis
  • How many hours you can stand and walk out of an eight hour day
  • How many hours you can sit out of an eight hour day
  • Your ability to push and pull hand and foot controls
  • Climb (ramps, ladders, ropes, scaffolds, stairs)
  • Balance
  • Kneel
  • Stoop
  • Crouch
  • Crawl
  • Reaching (including overhead reaching)
  • Handling (gross manipulation such as the ability to use a hammer or turn a doorknob)
  • Fingering (fine manipulation such as the ability to write with a pencil or fasten a button)
  • Feeling (the ability to feel temperatures, pain, etc. with your hands)
  • Vision-near acuity
  • Vision-far acuity
  • Vision-field of vision
  • Vision-accommodation
  • Vision-depth perception
  • Vision-color vision
  • Hearing
  • Speaking
  • Exposure to extreme cold
  • Exposure to extreme heat
  • Exposure to wetness
  • Exposure to humidity
  • Exposure to noise
  • Exposure to vibration
  • Exposure to fumes, gases, dust, odors, and poor ventilation
  • Exposure to hazards (for example, dangerous machinery and heights)

Whenever you are filling out forms for SSA, talking to your disability determination specialist on the phone, or are being examined by a doctor for SSA, be sure to communicate all the ways in which your condition limits your ability to do these work-related functions. If you have your doctor write a letter to SSA for you, have him or her address how your condition limits your ability to do these work-related functions.

           

 

  

 

  

 


 
 

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