The Disability Expert

A Free Guide to Social Security Disability Insurance and Supplemental Security Income Disability Benefits


 

 
 

The Cardiovascular Accident (Stroke) and Disability Benefits

By R. M. Bottger

The cardiovascular accident is commonly called a stroke by the general public. A diagnosis of cardiovascular accident (stroke) alone is not enough for the Social Security Administration  to make its decision. Some people who have cardiovascular accidents (strokes) have very little residual limitations. Some people who have cardiovascular accidents (strokes) die. There is a wide range of limitations between these two extremes. SSA will need more information about your functional limitations to decide your Social Security disability claim.

SSA will want copies of all of your medical records from all places you have received treatment. (See What Medical Records Should You Submit When You Apply for Disability Benefits?) This includes all doctors, hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, physical therapy, and any other kind treatment that you have received.

 SSA will want to know how your ability to function is limited due to your cardiovascular accident (stroke). (See How Your Condition Affects Your Ability to Function: The Key to Disability Benefits.) Be sure to tell SSA all of the ways that you are limited due to your cardiovascular accident (stroke). SSA will then need medical evidence to confirm your limitations. Do you have weakness on one side of your body due to your cardiovascular accident (stroke)? If so, how does it limit you? Is your ability to walk limited? If so, how is your speed and safety affected? Are you confined to a wheelchair? Do you require a cane or walker in order to walk? Is the use of your hands limited? If so, what is your grip strength? How is your gross manipulation limited (for example, the ability to use a hammer or turn a doorknob)? How is your fine manipulation limited (for example, the ability to write with a pencil or fasten a button)? Is your speech affected by your cardiovascular accident (stroke)? If so, what percentage of your speech is intelligible? Is your vision affected by your cardiovascular accident (stroke)? What is your visual acuity? Are you having mental problems as a result of your cardiovascular accident (stroke)? Are you having memory loss (there are standardized tests to measure memory)? Are you having poor concentration, depression, anxiety, or other mental problems? If so, SSA will want more information as to the severity of the impairment. Do you have any other mental or physical impairments as a result of the cardiovascular accident (stroke)? What daily activities are you no longer able to do as a result of your stroke (such as drive a car, read, bathe alone, etcetera)?

Be sure to tell SSA all of the ways that you are limited due to your cardiovascular accident (stroke). If you have your doctor write a letter for you for SSA, have your doctor give detailed information about how your condition limits your ability to function. The more complete the information you give SSA, the better SSA can make its decision.

           

 

 

 

 


 
 

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